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A Dancer’s Rights

By: The Dance World Editor

By: The Dance Project

10 Rights I Wish I Knew I Had as a Dancer

Some lessons, I suppose, are best learned the hard way, and I hope that you’ll be able to learn from my mistakes.

The biggest mistake? Not knowing my rights as a dancer.

Knowing my rights, that I had the power to make my own decisions and stand up for them, could have kept me dancing for longer.

Some of these ideas may ruffle some dance-parent and dance teacher feathers, but I think it’s important for dancers to be empowered and know that every part of their career is a choice, and THEY need to make those choices.

10 things you are entitled to choose as a dancer:

1. You  have the right to choose your dance studio/teacher. If you have a teacher that makes you feel bad about your body or your abilities, you should voice your concerns and find a new teacher.

2. You have the right to rest when you’re in pain, and not to feel guilty about it. No teacher should allow you to feel bad about sitting out because of an injury.

3. You have the right to do what you want with your summer and off-seasons. Dance teachers and parents may push summer intensives onto you, but if you know you need rest, or have something else in mind that you feel to be more productive and enjoyable, do that thing!

4. You have the right to ignore negative body talk. If teachers, peers, or parents suggest that you don’t have the “right body” for dance, give yourself permission to disregard it.

5. You have the right to a good performance therapist or rehabilitation specialist. One who understands dancers- Their bodies, their needs, and their mindset. Find someone who knows that dance is not the problem, but that a lack of education is. Allow that practitioner educate you on how to keep your body performing pain-free. You have the right to more than just a passive therapy, adjustment, or massage, but to be taught how to integrate this correction into your movement.

6. You have the right to filter the nay-sayers who tell you that dance isn’t a viable career choice, or that a dance degree won’t get you anywhere in life. Whether you get a career in dance or not, dance is a wonderful holistic form of education.

7. You have the right to tell a dance teacher when to not touch you. Dance teachers mean well, and most of the time it is totally OK when they use touch to correct you, but some teachers take it over the top- Forcing you into stretches that are beyond your limit can sometimes harm you, and you must learn to tell them politely to please not do that because it hurts.

8. You have the right to choose how much and how seriously you dance. This may sound silly, but I know there are some dancers out there who are pressured by their parents or teachers to dance more or compete more, when they might only want to pursue dance for fun. Speak up!

9. You have the right not to let the fears of others affect your decisions.  You don’t have to let anyone-teachers, parents, peers- make choices for you. Accept advice and constructive criticism, but if you are making choices to please someone else, it isn’t going to help you.

10. You have the right to drop out of a dance program, change careers, or take 17 years off from dance and not feel bad. Life is crazy and unpredictable- You don’t know where it’s going to take you. Your best dancing days might be in your 40s. If taking a break from dance now means you’ll be able to enjoy dance as an adult, that’s an acceptable choice to make.

Did I miss anything? What other rights do we dancers need to stand up for?

NYC Dance Photography Project

New York City Dance Photography Project

By: The Dance World Editor

DANCERS NEEDED

BE A PART OF DANCE AS ART- A COLLABORATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT!

Dance As Art- The New York City Photography Project is a protest, an exhibition and a street show designed to raise awareness of the need for the arts and artists in New York City. It’s getting a great amount of attention on social media and in the mainstream press and I would like you to be a part of it!

WHAT WE NEED:

Exceptionally talented individuals in great shape with a very, very strong background in ballet or modern dance who aren’t afraid to be in full dance attire anywhere from a subway car to Grand Central Station!

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO:

Fill out our application form below and we can go from there!

Details:

If you are interested in being involved in a project that will be professionally shot, allow you to showcase your talent, be featured and promoted as part of our project and help increase awareness of the arts, then this is certainly for you!

I am doing location shoots throughout New York focused on juxtaposing the beauty of motion of the human body with mundane and landmark New York locations and situations. It’s also a bit of a street show as we tend to draw crowds where ever we go and the audience interaction is in fact part of the project!

The shoots usually last 2-3 hour and most of them take place either early in the morning (6 am – 8 am) or around sunset (6 pm-8pm) or the middle of the day (1 pm to 3 pm.)

Dress for most of the shoots is classic dance attire with hair and makeup as if you are going to do a performance.

It’s an unpaid gig, but there are many benefits to being a part of the Dance As Art ensemble. Your image will be seen by the tens of thousands of Dance As Art fans and we will promote you and your career with a special section on our biography page and you will also be able to use the photographs privately for auditions as part of your portfolio.

Thanks for responding and I look forward to working with you!

Fill Out Our Dancer Application Form Here

Staff Training Made Easy

By  on July 13, 2015
By: The Dance World Editor
DTW_training_MAINBy Angela D’Valda Sirico of Dance Teacher Web

The main season is over and we have had the excitement of the recitals and all end of year performances, and although some studios continue running over the summer offering programs for their dancers, it is usually a quieter time as families take their vacations and children go to sleep away camps. Summer is a wonderful time to re-train your staff or to bring new staff members in to train from scratch.

At the end of each season we like to take a look back at how the business ran and to find ways to make improvements and help our employees do a better job in a more productive way. Even the most seasoned staff member can use a little motivation and some new ideas on how to operate the studio. Perhaps you feel that your studio is running at its optimum level and that is fantastic but I would suggest that you take a more in depth look because in my experience even when things appear to be running smoothly there is inevitably something that we can improve upon!

I have found that the best way for me is to meet with my staff first of all and write down any ideas that they may have as to how the day to day operation of the studio can be streamlined, and then find real ways that we can implement these ideas. Between their ideas and ones that we come up with there is always something to be done. It is really helpful to talk and listen to your staff because they are, after all working at your business year round and will have a good knowledge of ways to improve their job. Sometimes you may feel that they could improve on some aspect of their work and if that is the case they will need some training to help them improve in that direction.

This is a good time to listen to how they are answering the phone and talking to both present and future customers. Perhaps they are forgetting to say something that you feel is important to point out to customers, they may just have slightly watered down what you want them to say and not even be aware of it. We had one front desk person who was good at her job but always in a bit of a hurry and she would end up saying so much to customers that she overwhelmed them with a lot of noise and only confused them. She meant well but in her quick fire delivery she really wasn’t listening to what the customer had to say and consequently didn’t get the right message to them. We re-trained her to stop and take a breath and to talk at a slower pace so that if gave the other person a chance to explain what they were looking for. She really responded well and now has a great delivery. As I used to say to her, “Less is more!” and in this case it certainly was.

If you have hired someone new it is much easier to train them when it is not as crazy and hectic so that they have a chance to absorb all of the materials that are used to manage the studio plus how it operates on a day to day basis. We have always found that it is so helpful to have a manual for the staff. The manual simply lays out in a clear and concise way how to handle everything at the front desk and in the office, Of course, there are always exceptions to every rule but it is great as a referral and a tool to keep everyone on the same page.

Whether you are training or re-training your staff it is a good idea to do it over a period of days. I have found in the past that if I throw too much at them at one time things definitely get lost in the shuffle so again, making a plan of what needs to be covered and what day you are going to cover it with them will make a big difference to all.

Running any business is an ongoing process and it is not only a challenge but can also be a lot of fun to make everyone who works for you stay on their toes! Find out where you think the organization has the weak links and then go in like a surgeon and fix them together with your staff. Everyone will feel more organized and revitalized when new ideas are implemented. Once you have finished the training, reward your employees by taking them for a nice meal away from the studio and have a toast together for the new and improved business that you are all a part of.

Finding the True Meaning of Teaching Dance

By Angela D’Valda Sirico of Dance Teacher Web

By: The Dance World Editor

As a teacher you are probably earning a sustainable salary, but also think of success as not only being a monetary thing. It’s also about having happiness, successful relationships and the ability to help your students not only attain success in dance but in their lives as well. If we are able to give back to the society we live in by helping the people around us we will feel challenged and fulfilled and know that we have a mission for our life. Perhaps that all sounds a little out there but it really is true. We need to express ourselves and realize our uniqueness to feel satisfied in our daily lives. Just as we need to challenge our students, so must we do that with ourselves too! The things that truly move you will give you the passion that you need to bring into your classes and your daily life.

Ask yourself a few simple questions: 

  1. What are your core values?
  2. Who do you admire most as a person and professional?
  3. What goals should you set for yourself?
  4. What human cause affects you most or is dearest to your heart?
  5. What can you do to help and how can you use your professional knowledge?
  6. How can you provide the people around you with a memorable experience?   DTW_TeacherInspiration_MAIN

Establishing your core values is important because only by doing that do we really find out what is important to us. Easy, you say, but is it? Start the process by making a list of all the values you most admire in others and then rate them from 1-10. There are no bad values it just depends which are more important to you. If you understand this you will understand what gives your life the most meaning. If your life has more meaning you will be capable of giving more to your relationships both personal and professional. Your teaching will take on new meaning and your ability to create content for classes and choreography will be greater. So often we have no real time to think clearly so find a place to go where you will be uninterrupted as you do a little self-analysis.

Deciding who you most admire in any part of your life may not be difficult but understanding exactly why, may take more time. Whatever the reasons, don’t be intimidated by them but learn from them and find ways to apply the same principles to yourself.

Goal setting is always important but make sure that you set them for all areas of your life, not just your professional one. Find out what you would most like to change and then write down a plan to make it come true. Visualizing your dreams and goals on a daily basis really does work. It trains your mind to accept nothing less. Don’t live someone else’s goals, set your own and make a decision to move forward.

Do you have a cause that is close to your heart? Is there some injustice that you would like to help make right? Whatever moves you is the direction you should go towards. Do research on the subject, start small and don’t try to change the world overnight. Once you get started on the road to helping a cause all kinds of opportunities could present themselves to you. Find out how you can use your expertise to help those less fortunate and then just take that first step.

Making memorable moments for the people around you is really not difficult if you are aware of what makes them happy and fulfilled. It is not always the grand gesture that has the most impact, sometimes it is just doing small things or having a moment that people really value and remember. I always think of one of my former students when I think of memorable moments as a teacher. This young man was extremely thoughtful and yet quite a difficult personality to teach but no matter what, that student would always remember to bring me a chocolate with almond flavor because he knew I liked it. That small gesture is ingrained in my memory and happened many years ago. It was just one human being reaching out to another. Isn’t that really what makes it all worthwhile?

Discovering more about ourselves helps us to give more to others. Staying focused on what is important to us gives us the power to be able to extend our knowledge and empathy to our students and our employers. Challenging ourselves helps us to stay ahead of the game as teachers and individuals to live a happier and more successful life

About Angela D’Valda Sirico

Originally from England, Angela received her early training from one of Margot Fonteyn’s childhood teachers, Carol Bateman. She later attended the Arts Educational Trust and was invited to perform with the Festival Ballet in London, but decided instead to continue her studies in the US. Angela began an extremely varied professional career performing around the world, and later met her husband Steve Sirico while filming a TV special. After years of performing together around the world, their focus shifted to teaching. Angela is a published author, as well as Co-Founder of Dance Teacher Web. www.danceteacherweb.com

New Capezio Pointe Shoe “The Airess”

My Pointe Shoe Story – From Beginner to Airess

By The Dance World Editor July 31, 2015

From Dance Informa

Do you remember your first pointe shoe fitting and your first pointe class? Although it was uncomfortable and unconventional, it was so magical to dance on your toes. Your shoes were shiny, new and so pretty and you felt like a real ballerina.

Alison-Stroming-Capezio-Pointe-Shoes-700x250

Finding your feet in pointe is a personal journey from how you sew your ribbons and break in your shoes to what style and brand you like to wear. Some dancers seem to transition to pointe like they were made to dance on their toes and others find it a challenge of perseverance, blisters, bunions and cramping arches or aching ankles. Any ballerina will agree, though, that no matter the pain, pointe is worth its ethereal illusion of weightlessness. Ballerinas are happiest when upon their toes.

Award-winning, young competition dancer and model Tate McRae, 12, started dancing at six and first started pointe about two years ago, at 10 and a half. “When I finally got en pointe, it was a dream come true,” she exclaimed. “I am finally a ballerina,” she thought.

allison2

Read the full article My Pointe Shoe Story

 

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How to Stretch your Feet

By:The Dance World Editor

By: Ballet Hub

Stretching and strengthening your feet have many benefits to your overall technique and presentation as a ballet dancer.  Dancers have found all sorts of ways to stretch feet over the years using all sorts of tecnhniques like cramming their feet under a piano or couch, using tools built specifically to stretch feet, or even asking a friend to do it. And while some are effective, some other techniques can actually be quite risky and may result in injury.

A dancer strives for two things, among many others: strength and flexibility.  One without the other and there is an imbalance.

Today we’ll show you a couple ways to stretch your feet that are both safe and easy.

These foot stretches are simple stretches that don’t require you to buy anything, ask anyone or use any tools.

Foot Stretch Technique #1: Grab and Pull Back

simple safe foot stretch for ballet dancerThe basic idea, as you may have guessed, is that you grab your foot and pull back.  Let’s take a look:

  • Sitting on the floor, place the foot you want to stretch over your other thigh to create a figure 4 with your legs.
  • With the hand closest to your heel, push into your heel.  Be sure to relax your Achilles!  (the large band coming down from your calf that attaches to your heel)
  • With the hand closest to your toes, place it over your toes and up your foot a couple inches and pull back so that your foot arches, feeling a nice stretch on the top.

And that’s it!  It’s simple but effective.  Need a little more stretch?  Read on for technique number 2!

Foot Stretch Technique #2: Wrap n’ Push

It’s not really called “Wrap n’ Push,” as that name was made up just seconds ago.  More important than thinking of a creative label, is how effective this foot stretch really is!  If you find that stretching your feet with your hands hasn’t quite worked well, this one is for you.  Let’s take a look

  • Once again, sitting on the floor, place the foot you want to stretch over your other thigh to create a figure 4 with your legs.
  • Lift your foot up slightly and wrap your arm (that is on the same side of the leg you bent) under your bent leg, grabbing the top of your foot toward your toes with your hand.
  • With your free hand, place it on top of your hand that is grabbing on the top and bottom half of your foot.
  • Lean slightly forward so that your elbow is tucked more closely under your calf and the top of your arm is pushing right into your calf muscle.
  • Now that you’re setup, be sure not to feel any tension in your knee and remember to relax your foot and Achilles.
  • Begin stretching your foot by pulling back with both of your hands and at the same time equally pushing your leg forward.

 

 

foot stretching technique for ballet dancers
Stretching TechniqueSitting on the floor, cross one leg over the other to make a figure 4.
Foot stretching exercise for dancer on floor
Wrap your arm underneath your leg and foot, placing your hand on top, over the bottom half, of your foot.
foot stretch for dancers increase flexibility
Place your free hand over the hand that is already holding your foot.
foot stretching on ground for better feet dancer
Begin the foot stretch by pulling back with your hands while your lean forward.

By pulling equally on your foot with your hands and pushing out with your arm, your leg shouldn’t actually move, but you should feel quite a bit more extra strength to better stretch your foot.

You can play around with this one to best suit it to your body, but the push and pull action that allows for the additional strength is the general idea.

Remember, you should never feel that you are straining or “working too hard” to stretch your feet.  You don’t want to overstretch your feet.  Ease into it slowly and take a break from time to time to let the whole foot relax.  You will end up getting more out of your stretches this way.

a great foot stretch for dancersHere is one final look at this effective stretch, but from the angle you’d see if trying it for yourself.

Why Are These Foot Stretches More Safe and While Some Others Aren’t?

The biggest reason why these foot stretches are more safe is because you are in complete control of the stretch and you are doing it with your hand, meaning you are not adding additional stress on your body.  For example, other stretches may often involve the dancer prying their feet underneath a heavy object and stretching their knee until they feel a stretch.  By doing so, the dancer is placing an incredible amount of tension and strain on the knee joint, muscles in the leg, and digging their heel painfully into the ground for more leverage.

You don’t want to overstretch your feet.

Another popular (for unknown reasons) method for stretching feet is asking a friend to stretch your feet.  For this to happen, the asker first must assume that the stretcher is actually okay with touching his or her feet.  Then the asker usually sits on the floor with a leg stretched out in front while the stretcher pushes down with a lot of force.  This is basically the same idea of prying your foot underneath a heavy object, but now you are at risk of your friend pushing down with enough force that by the time you yell out “Ouch!” its too late and you’ve overstretched your foot.  This technique, though popular in schools, is not recommended for many reasons, besides safety, you are now relying on someone else to do the work for you, which is like asking someone to do all of your homework while you get the credit.

Still, Always Be Careful

Stretching your feet is always recommended, so long as you aren’t facing an injury of course.  But that being said, you always want to be careful.  Don’t stretch your feet so much that you’re actually causing them to be weak, which leads us to our final tip.  Also, be sure that you stretching your feet in a sickled position.

Always Wrap Up With a Few Strengthening Exercises

Now that you’ve stretched your feet so well, you want them to be able to get there on their own without help from your hands.  There is little chance that will happen without adding some exercises to strengthen your feet in the range of their new found flexibility. After you’ve done some foot stretching, be sure to grab a therapy band for some strengthening exercises or do some tendus.

A dancer strives for two things, among many others: strength and flexibility.  One without the other and there is an imbalance.  Weak but very flexible feet can be just as much of a hurdle as strong but flexible feet when it comes to ballet technique.

For more on this article CLICK HERE

Secret Cure for Ingrown Toenails

By: The Dance World Editor

 By: Shannon Marie Rugani

As if dancing on my toes wasn’t painful enough, I suffered from ingrown toenails for years. It got to the point that I didn’t even know what a healthy toenail was supposed to look like. I saw a podiatrist who said that I should have surgery to remove part of the ingrown toenail. The recovery time would take two to three months before I would be able to dance again. I didn’t want to miss out on dancing for that long so I suffered through dancing on four ingrown toenails.

One of my colleagues told me about an old wives’ tale to get rid of ingrown toenails. I was so desperate to try anything that I gave it a try. It worked! Not only did they go away, they have never come back!

According to the old wives’ tale, you cut a V-shape into the center of the toenail. The nail gravitates toward the weakest part of the nail, so if the sides are weak, the nail will grow toward the side resulting in ingrown toenails. By cutting the V in the center of the nail, it starts growing toward the V to close the gap. The nail starts growing in rather than out. This is such a simple yet effective cure and I’ve been cutting a V into my toenails ever since.

For those of you who do not have ingrown toenails, I’ll tell you how to prevent them. Cut your toe nails straight across, then use a nail file to smooth the sharp ends of the nail. Stop somewhere around the tip of the toe before it becomes too short to prevent sensitivity. If you keep your nails square, you will be able to avoid ingrown toenails.

ingrowntoes

I am not a podiatrist, but I hope this simple trick helps you either get rid of ingrown toenails or prevent them from ever happening. Happy dancing!

For more on Shannon Marie Rugani click here

 

INJURY PREVENTION 101

By: The Dance World Editor

By Leigh Schanfein of Dance Informa

Nutrition

We often think of using food as fuel: ingest it, burn it, use it for energy. However, food and beverages are what our bodies use for every function, from muscle contraction to nerve impulse to new cell formation! Many foods, especially natural and minimally processed foods, provide us with many nutrients that our bodies use in a myriad of ways. For example, the mineral calcium is well known for being a hugely important part of bone health by helping us build and maintain bone density. But, did you know that calcium is also critical for creating an electric impulse that travels down a nerve, or for allowing a muscle to relax after contracting? Our bodies host a complex orchestration that allows us to function under conditions ranging from maximal exertion to complete rest.

There are six nutrient groups: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats, Vitamins, Minerals and Water.  Most foods contain more than one nutrient but it is important to eat a wide variety of food to make sure we get them all! ALL are important, so do not cut any out of your diet.

Carbohydrates are primarily used for short-term energy while fats are primarily used for long-term energy, insulation and cell formation. Proteins make muscles and many other cells, and we need to consume enough carbohydrates and fats so that we aren’t using up our proteins for energy. The only complete food source for protein is meat, so vegetarians must make sure they eat a good variety of plant-sources to get all the essential amino acids.

Vitamins and minerals are used in many different bodily functions. Fat-soluble vitamins are easily stored in the body but water-soluble vitamins are easily flushed out so we need to consume them on a daily basis. Did you know water is a nutrient? It is so vital to your health that losing only 1% of your body weight in water can result in the ill effects of dehydration. Plenty of research has shown that losing even 2% can result in huge deficits in physical and mental performance!

Gradual Loading

This sounds like a term more suitable to carrying boxes! Basically, we do not want to overwork our bodies by doing too much too soon. We should make physical changes gradually. Research has found that dancers tend to get injured when they have a dramatic change in their workload, either a rapid increase in the amount of dancing or a quick transition to a new style of dance for which the body is unprepared.

How can we prepare our bodies for such changes? Rather than jumping right into a new schedule or new repertory, we should do what we can to introduce our bodies to the change by taking time to increase the volume and/or intensity of physical load. This could mean gradually increasing the number of classes we take as we transition from time off back into our full dance schedules. Or it could be increasing the number of repetitions we do of class combinations to improve strength or endurance in preparation for starting a new rehearsal period.

Another example might be as specific as introducing our bodies to a new dance style or choreography. A little research will go a long way; if you find out you will be doing modern rep and you are not used to working in parallel, start doing some exercises at home that strengthen your adductors and internal rotators. If you know you’re going to be doing a high intensity dance that has you sweating and panting, add some cardio exercises and increase your reps in class until your endurance is spot on. When you know the demands, you can make smart adjustments and prevent overuse and fatigue.

Read the full article here for more injury prevention information.

Photo (top): © Handmademedia | Dreamstime.com

Dancer Recommended Recipes!

By: The Dance World editor

By:  Amy Omernick

dancerreicpesblog

Check out what these dancers recommend as great recipes for dancers! We have a few of our own too.

 

Kimberly Braylock, San Francisco Ballet
Kale Chips
Click here for the recipe via Smitten Kitchen 

Melissa Chapski, Ellison Ballet
Chia Raspberry Drink
Click here for the recipe via Mama Natural

Miko Fogarty, Indiana Ballet Conservatory
Dried Mango
Click here for the recipe via POPSUGAR

Samantha Figgins, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
An Avocado and Hummus
Click here for the recipe via Inspired Taste

Angeli Mamon, Pacific Northwest Ballet
Luna Bars
Click here for the recipe via Chocolate-covered Kate 

Shannon Rugani, San Francisco Ballet
Greens Energy Bar
Click here for the recipe via Epicurious

Danielle Hernandez, The Dance World Editor  & Competitive Latin Dancer

Strawberry/Kiwi Smoothie (add a scoop of protein 11-14 grams recommended)

Click here for the recipe via All Recipes 

Want more on healthy dancer recipes? Email the Dance World Editor!

danielle@on1dancewear.com

 

Pilates & Dance

PILATES & DANCE

By: The Dance World Editor

By: Kristen Padden

Looking for the perfect cross training exercise to enhance your dance technique?
Pilates may be just the thing to help you strengthen your core while increasing flexibility and it happens to be lots of fun too!pilatesimage1

Dance greats like Mikhail Baryshnikov, George Balanchine, Rudolf von Laban, Hanya Holm, and Martha Graham all used the Pilates method!

WHAT IS PILATES?
Pilates is a mind-body exercise program developed by Joseph Pilates in the early 20th century. Pilates uses movement and breath to stretch, strengthen, and balance the body. Full body movements performed on a mat, or using specially designed equipment, focus on the core muscle groups of the abdomen and the back.

THE PILATES – DANCE CONNECTION
Although founder Joseph Pilates was not a dancer, he worked with many famous dancers when he moved to the United States from Europe. Dance greats like Mikhail Baryshnikov, George Balanchine, Rudolf von Laban, Hanya Holm, and Martha Graham worked with Pilates and often sent their dancers to see him for injury rehabilitation.

So why did these dance masters, and hundreds of dancers since, take to Pilates so eagerly? For one, both disciplines use the whole body, and focus the mind in their movements. Both Pilates and dance tend to create long and lean muscles, and use resistance and momentum to work on strength, flexibility, and posture.

In addition, many of the exercises in isolate key muscles used in dance technique, thus naturally strengthening dance movements. When I studied dance in college, Pilates training was part of a body alignment class I took. After several months of working on the Pilates Reformer apparatus, I noticed my balance in ballet class had improved, as did my pirouettes, and strength in jumping.

pilatesimage2

 

Click HERE for more on Pilates

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